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PRINCIPLE INVESTIGATOR

David G. Lynn, PhD

 

BA: University of Chapel Hill, NC

PhD: Duke University, NC

Post Doc: Columbia University, NY

David Lynn is an Asa Griggs Candler Professor in Chemistry and Biology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor at Emory University. His research deals with the origins of molecular order in the biosphere, and he serves as one of the founding members of the Advisory Board of the Atlanta Science Festival.

dlynn2@emory.edu

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Graduate students

Anthony Sementilli

Member since 2015

 

BS: Saint Joseph's College, NY

My research focuses on using amyloids a novel bioelectronic materials. A third of all proteins rely on metal centers for functionality, but peptide assemblies can bind 1,000+ metals ions, like Cu(II), per structure. Achieving such a density of active metals along a ordered interface engenders these metallopeptides with catalytic properties such as peroxidase-like activity and reversible electron storage. In my spare time, I enjoy creative writing, baking, and  watching more TV shows than I can handle.

anthony.sementilli@emory.edu

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Youngsun Kim

Member since 2016

 

BS: Kwangwoon University, Seoul, Korea

youngsun.kim@emory.edu​

Christella Dhammaputri

Member since 2015

 

BS: Emory University, GA

I study how nucleic acids interact with amyloid assemblies and functionalize these networks. My past work includes creating a nuclease-sensitive amyloid-templated hydrogel and exploring a novel multilamellar nanotubes formed by DNA-peptide co-assemblies.  Currently, I am investigating the properties and structural identity of G-Quadruplex DNA-peptide chimera.  Because G-Quadruplexes have been implicated in charge transport, we hope this chimera could be used in bioelectronics. I'm also passionate about languages, food, and my dog, Daisy!

christella.dhammaputri@emory.edu

Ayanna Jones

Member since 2019

 

BS: Clark Atlanta University, GA

MS: Georgia Institute of Technology, GA

With my research, I examine the unique chemistry of the rhizosphere in plants using both experimental and computational approaches. My work examines cellular signaling between parasitic plants and pathogens to provide a window into the chemical dynamics that might ensure cellular order. I seek to show that we can control this complex and highly organized organ and provide valuable insight into the stabilization of plant health and food production in the face of climate change. ​In my free time I enjoy reading, attending concerts, and spending time with friends and family. 

ayanna.j.jones@emory.edu

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underGraduate students

Regina Luu 

Member since 2019

BS: Emory University (2021)

regina.luu@emory.edu

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LAB MASCOTS

Daisy

Member since 2017

I'm the group's branch manager (see picture). I make sure all squirrels are off the premises and that the contents of our trash cans are delicious. I like taking long walks, getting pats, ​om-nomming sleeves, and attacking my own leash. All in all a fun-loving pupper.

crazy.daisy@woofmail.grr